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There Is a Time to Grieve

Dan Puckett
Fri, Jul 31, 2009
2 Comments

In Ecclesiastes 3:4 Solomon declared, "There is a time to weep . . . a time to mourn."

Grief is a love word. We cannot grieve if we do not or did not love. God grieves over people and their lifestyles because He loves them.

Grief is like being plunged into a pit. We fight for air; we plunge the depths until we find the bottom. When we find the bottom, we realize that God is there with His everlasting arms.

David the Psalmist found God was with him as he traversed through the valley of the shadow of death in Psalm 23.

When God was allowing Job to be tested, all of Job's children were killed. Job's response was profound grief. We read that "at this, Job got up and tore his robe and shaved his head. Then he fell to the ground in worship" (Job 1:20).

Grief rips, strips, and reduces us to a crumpled heap on the ground. From his posture on the ground, Job concluded, "May the name of the LORD be praised" (Job 1:21).

The New Testament exhorts us to let the hard times work on us for our good. James said, "The testing of your faith develops perseverance" (James 1:3). He continues in verse 4, "Perseverance must finish its work so that you may be mature." Grief is a process that we must not cut short. Let it take us as deep as God wants to go with us.

Psalm 88 is a song of the Sons of Korah. Korah opposed Moses during the wilderness journey from Egypt to Canaan, and he was destroyed by God. The Sons of Korah grieved deeply for their loss. In verse 18, they exclaimed, "You have taken my companions and loved ones from me; the darkness is my closest friend."

Darkness is not something we generally seek out, but there, in the absence of light, our other senses are increased. In the silence, in the dark night, is when we sense the presence of God most strongly.

The Psalmist David was walking a low road in Psalm 139, but his conclusions lift all of us. He discovered God's power, God's presence, God's love, and God's plan. Then he implored God, "Search me, O God . . . test me . . . lead me" (Psalm 139:23-24).

There is a time to grieve. We read in Psalm 30:5, "Weeping may remain for a night, but rejoicing comes in the morning."

Comments

#1
Lisa
November 14, 2010

Someone once said; "the Lord does not measure out of our afflictions according to our faults, but according to our strengths, and looks not at what we have deserved but at what we are able to bear." Do not allow yourself to question God's wisdom, praise Him for what you are able to accomplish, in your time of grief. "What are termed afflictions in the language of men, are in the Language of God called blessing." Out of the five stages of grief/blessings comes the greatest of God's grace, that being love. And if we do not have pain, we cannot have faith in God to deliver us from it. For without suffering there is no reason for deliverence, and without deliverence we miss out on the blessing of praising God, and giving Him honor and glory. Could we all live without pain and suffering, yes, but if that were so, none of us would have eternal life. "It is by suffering that our faith is tried, and, therefore we are made more accessible to God." I am in the tenth month of my grieving process. My niight is passing, and with it goes my weeping. I can feel the dawn approaching, as my tears subside and they are wiped away by the hand of God.

#2
Lisa
November 14, 2010

Someone once said; "the Lord does not measure out of our afflictions according to our faults, but according to our strengths, and looks not at what we have deserved but at what we are able to bear." Let that be your lamppost to a brighter tomorrow. Do not allow yourself to question God's wisdom, praise Him for what you are able to accomplish. "What are termed afflictions in the language of men, are in the Language of God called blessing." Out of the five stages of grief/blessings comes the greatest of God's grace, that being love. And if we do not have pain, we cannot have faith in God to deliver us from it. For without suffering there is no reason for deliverence, and without deliverence we miss out on the blessing of praising God, and giving Him honor and glory. Could we all live without pain and suffering, yes, but if that were so, none of us would have eternal life. "It is by suffering that our faith is tried, and, therefore we are made more accessible to God." I am in the tenth month of my grieving process.



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